Category Archives: Alternative Energy

Returning to Simplicity

Dear Readers: I’m currently writing a long-form post twice a month now for Chris Martenson’s excellent website. Accordingly, I’ll be publishing the first (and free) part of these essays here at เกมยิงปลาสุดมันส์ www.dongythoxuanduong.com. Enjoy. — Gregor ___________________________________________________________________________ photo: BP Oil Leak photo series via Boston Globe, Mark Ralston – AFP/Getty Images Eventually the point is reached […]

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Transition to Renewables and The Forward Speed of Economies

From CarbonTracker.org comes this very useful accounting of global fossil fuel reserves, by market listing on stock exchanges. The risk identified in their report, Unburnable Carbon – Are the World’s Financial Markets Carrying a Carbon Bubble?, is that markets have accorded value to energy resources which may never be extracted. The reason? A rather hopeful […]

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Red Metal Hour: The Copper Problem Accelerates

As we roll through earning’s season a report that caught my attention was Rio Tinto’s earlier this month, which showed copper production from their principle mine, Escondida, down significantly on the year. Here is the Financial Times, on 14 July: Rio Tinto revealed a steep decline in output at the world’s largest copper mine, demonstrating […]

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Global Hydro and Nuclear Power in Perspective

At the recent ASPO conference in Washington, DC I found myself in a lunchtime conversation discussing the contributions Nuclear and Hydro were making to world energy supply. It’s worth noting that Hydropower did experience an uptick in global use in the past five years. Nuclear meanwhile, which has seen a slowing rate of consumption since […]

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Visualizing US Energy Policy

There is a rather antiquated belief that the oil and gas industry drives US energy policy. This is usually framed in people’s minds as a pleading oil and gas lobbyist making sure that the US stays hooked on oil. While this image may be accurate with regards to the US coal industry, which does indeed […]

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The Intractability of the Built Environment

If climate change worries you most, then you cannot be happy to learn that oil from Alberta tar sands is about to supply the biggest chunk of US oil imports. Indeed, if peak oil concerns you most, or if the future of the US economy concerns you most, you cannot be happy to hear this […]

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Battery Technology and Energy Transition

The Los Angeles Times had a pretty good piece this weekend profiling the inventor behind A123 Systems (based in Boston), and the tremendous hurdles that now exist for any US company that wishes to manufacture in the United States. Fighting for ‘Made in the USA’ therefore is an excellent portrait of how we lose a […]

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DIY Energy Transition

In the latest issues of เกมยิงปลาสุดมันส์ www.dongythoxuanduong.com Monthly, Copenhagen Confirmation, (see: เกมยิงปลาสุดมันส์ www.dongythoxuanduong.com 2009 Annual for a discounted price on this issue) I explained that not only were energy transition and climate-change mitigation essentially the same problem but that world political leaders would do precisely zero about either. A political leader of any country, developed or developing, […]

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Choosing An Energy Deficit

Energy analyst and author Richard Heinberg published a sobering piece on energy transition and climate change last week, and he hits upon a theme that I’ve been addressing in my recent work on coal. Titled, Trying to Save the World, Heinberg writes about the energy deficit one would be choosing to enter, as part of […]

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Coal World

The November issue of เกมยิงปลาสุดมันส์ www.dongythoxuanduong.com Monthly, Coal World, has now been published and it carries an unhappy message. I am forecasting that the world will not successfully transition from oil to a broad basket of renewable energy and power sources over the next twenty years. Instead, I strongly favor an outcome in which oil, the […]

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